Total projects found for "Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers (RRTCs)" : 28   Research Projects - New Search



Capacity Building for Rehabilitation Research and Training.

Langston University Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Research and Capacity Building for Minority Entities.
Langston University.
4205 North Lincoln Boulevard, Suite 102.
Oklahoma City, OK  73105.

E-mail: clmoore@langston.edu.
URL(s): http://www.langston.edu/capacitybuilding-rrtc.
Principal Investigator: Corey L. Moore, RhD.
Public Contact Phone: 405/530-7530.
Fax: 405/962-1638.
Project Number: H133B130023.
Start Date: October 1, 2013.
Length: 60 months.
NIDRR Officer: Shelley Reeves.
NIDRR Funding: FY 13 $875,000; FY 14 $875,000; FY 15 $875,000; FY 16 $875,000; FY 17 $875,000.
Abstract: This project engages minority entities (MEs) to generate new knowledge leading to improved outcomes for persons from traditionally underserved racial and ethnic populations and communities and to enhance research capacity and infrastructure at minority serving institutions. The project works with 6 MEs to address research infrastructure challenges and enhance the research skills of their individual faculty scholars and students. The following themes are addressed through five major studies and numerous capacity building activities: (1) describe and evaluate an emerging research team mentorship model across six different MEs; (2) examine factors that contribute to disability and rehabilitation research leaders’ career development and success to increase the number of talented researchers available to mentor ME junior investigators; (3) forecast the impact of new US citizen and legal permanent resident populations and trends on state vocational rehabilitation agencies’ (SVRAs) systems capacity to serve immigrants of color with disabilities; (4) describe SVRAs and Veteran Affairs co-service strategies aimed at placing veterans of color with disabilities into employment; (5) examine ME faculty scholars’ personal/intrinsic factors and extrinsic rewards that motivate them to conduct disability and rehabilitation research; and (6) pilot-test an emerging research capacity-building and infrastructure model across six different MEs. This project is developing and implementing a partnership plan that ensures that all activities are predominantly focused on research capacity and infrastructure building. The project plans a state-of-the science conference in the fourth year to discuss the research topics identified and devotes attention to demonstrating how findings are translated to practical applications in research, service initiatives, and policy development for persons of color with disabilities and ME research capacity-building efforts.
Descriptors: Capacity building, Mentoring, Minorities, Rehabilitation research.


Community Living and Participation.

Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Community Living Policy.
University of California at San Francisco.
3333 California Street, Suite 340.
San Francisco, CA  94118-0612.

E-mail: steve.kaye@ucsf.edu.
URL(s): http://www.communitylivingpolicy.org.
Principal Investigator: H. Stephen Kaye, PhD.
Public Contact Phone: 415/476-5164.
Project Number: H133B130034.
Start Date: October 1, 2013.
Length: 60 months.
NIDRR Officer: Phillip Beatty, PhD.
NIDRR Funding: FY 13 $875,000; FY 14 $875,000; FY 15 $875,000; FY 16 $875,000; FY 17 $875,000.
Abstract: This project identifies methods of improving the long-term services and support (LTSS) system in the US, improves data collection on community living policy, and develops a strategic plan for community living research through six broad research studies, knowledge translation (KT), training, technical assistance, and dissemination. Study objectives are to (1) develop a strategic plan for community living research, which involves convening an expert panel to identify and prioritize research questions, and then identifying research strategies that could address these questions; (2) identify promising practices in state LTSS systems, using workgroups to nominate candidate practices, followed by collection and synthesis of research findings on the practices, and then selection of promising practices by an expert panel; (3) conduct an inventory of state LTSS policies, practices, programs, and future plans, which includes surveys of state officials on policies related to access to home- and community-based services (HCBS) and collection of data on participants and expenditures in different HCBS programs in the states; (4) conduct evaluations and case studies, involving (a) the transition to managed LTSS in California; (b) comparisons across local managed LTSS implementations in California; (c) comparisons across managed LTSS and care coordination models implemented in Illinois; and (d) comparisons across model states in worker training standards; (5) conduct basic research on selected topics in community living, involving analysis of national survey datasets to obtain information on (a) trends in family caregiving and the impact of policy on caregiving; (b) supply of and demand for accessible, affordable housing; and (c) state variation in community participation among people with disabilities; and (6) develop methods for improved monitoring of progress in state LTSS systems, which involves needed data elements and strategizing ways of collecting that data and making it available for analysis. A KT effort provides stakeholder input into all phases of the research activities, identifies topics of interest for and approaches to dissemination, and helps create dissemination products. The project’s training activities are centered on developing an online curriculum for personal assistants and caregivers; while a technical assistance network will serve as a conduit between the project’s research and systems at the state level.
Descriptors: Community living, Families, Long-term services and supports, Policy.


Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Community Living.
The University of Kansas.
1000 Sunnyside Avenue, Room 4089.
Lawrence, KS  66045-7555.

E-mail: glen@ku.edu.
URL(s): http://www.rtcil.org.
Principal Investigator: Glen W. White, PhD.
Public Contact Phone: 785/864-4095 (V), 785/864-0706 (TTY).
Fax: 785/864-5063.
Project Number: H133B110006.
Start Date: October 1, 2011.
Length: 60 months.
NIDRR Officer: Pimjai Sudsawad, ScD.
NIDRR Funding: FY 11 $849,810; FY 12 $849,659; FY 13 $849,921; FY 14 $849,941; FY 15 $849,752.
Abstract: The goal of the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Community Living (RRTC/CL) is to increase the continuity of community living and full community participation of people with disabilities through the development and implementation of scientifically sound, theoretically driven, and evidence-based data analysis and interventions. The RRTC’s 13 core projects represent a comprehensive, integrated, and robust array of activities promoting community participation among people with disabilities. These projects recognize “disability” as an interaction between the characteristics of an individual and his/her environment. Six research projects conduct secondary data analyses to provide a knowledge foundation about how the barriers to and experiences of community living may differ across socio-demographic and geographic groups within the diverse population of individuals with disabilities. Five intervention projects evaluate the efficacy of programs, policies, and practices to improve services and supports that provide community participation opportunities for individuals with disabilities. These interventions address consumer participation needs in the areas of housing, health, recreation, and community and civic involvement. Several of these address the services and supports needed to transition from institutions, nursing homes, and other health and community institutions to the community and to maintain continuity of community living. Project investigators and staff regularly work with consumers with disabilities to incorporate their input on individual projects, as they are planned and implemented. The Center employs and adds to the latest knowledge translation approaches to disseminate research results that target multiple audiences, including advocates, policymakers, and program planners. The goal of the dissemination plan is to translate knowledge to allow scientists, policymakers, consumers, and consumer advocates in the area of disability and independent living to create and maintain greater opportunities for community living and participation of people with disabilities.
Descriptors: Independent living, Dissemination, Program evaluation.


ENhancing ACTivity and Participation for Persons with Arthritis (ENACT).
Trustees of Boston University.
881 Commonwealth Avenue.
Boston, MA  02215.

E-mail: jkeysor@bu.edu.
URL(s): http://www.bu.edu/enact
https://twitter.com/BU_ENACT.
Principal Investigator: Julie J. Keysor, PhD.
Public Contact Phone: 617/353-2735.
Project Number: H133B100003.
Start Date: October 1, 2010.
Length: 60 months.
NIDRR Officer: Theresa San Agustin, MD.
NIDRR Funding: FY 10 $799,983; FY 11 $799,968; FY 12 $799,992; FY 13 $799,988; FY 14 $799,992.
Abstract: This project advances, disseminates, and applies knowledge in rheumatological rehabilitation—an interdisciplinary field that integrates rheumatologic, musculoskeletal, neurological, behavioral, and social systems to optimize activity and participation among persons with arthritis. Project objectives include: (1) advancing science regarding effective interventions to optimize activity and enhance social, community, and work participation among persons with arthritis; (2) developing a team of interdisciplinary rheumatology rehabilitation clinical researchers knowledgeable in disablement, rehabilitation, rheumatology, and clinical research methods; and (3) disseminating knowledge, resources, and programs to consumers, providers, and researchers to promote activity and participation among persons with arthritis. These project objectives are addressed by a series of nine inter-related project activities: Project 1: “Efficacy of a Modified Vocational Rehabilitation Intervention for Work Disability” is a randomized controlled trial examining work disability outcomes of a structured intervention that poses solutions to work barriers identified by persons at risk of work loss; Project 2: “Can Computer-Based Telephone Counseling Improve Long-Term Adherence to Strength Training in Elders with Knee Osteoarthritis?” is a randomized controlled trial of a telecommunications physical activity adherence program for older adults with knee osteoarthritis; Project 3: “Community and Home Participation after Total Knee Replacement" is an epidemiological and qualitative study examining factors associated with poor participation outcomes post total knee joint replacement; Project 4: In partnership with Massachusetts Chapter of the Arthritis Foundation, a series of community consumer forums address knee osteoarthritis for members of underrepresented groups in the Greater Boston area; Project 5: A series of in-services and webinars are conducted to disseminate knowledge to providers of persons with arthritis; Project 6: A state-of-the-science conference on enhancing activity and participation for persons with arthritis is conducted; Project 7 is a partnership with the Arthritis Foundation to train new leaders of the Arthritis Foundation Exercise Program for future implementation of the program in underrepresented communities; Project 8: Development and evaluation of a new online program to help adults with knee osteoarthritis problem-solve the potential challenges experienced when initiating physical activity programs; and Project 9: Development and evaluation of a new online program providing resources for adults with arthritis optimizing job retention. Additionally, this project implements and evaluates a structured mentored training program developing a new group of scientists in the field of rheumatological rehabilitation.
Descriptors: Arthritis, Behavior disorders, Musculoskeletal disorders, Neurological disorders, Physical activity.


Research and Training Center on Community Living for People with Intellectual Disabilities.
University of Minnesota.
204 Pattee Hall, 150 Pillsbury Drive, SE.
Minneapolis, MN  55455-0223.

E-mail: rtc@umn.edu.
URL(s): http://rtc.umn.edu.
Principal Investigator: Amy Hewitt, PhD.
Public Contact Phone: 612/624-6328.
Fax: 612/625-6619.
Project Number: H133B130006.
Start Date: October 1, 2013.
Length: 60 months.
NIDRR Officer: Dawn Carlson, PhD, MPH.
NIDRR Funding: FY 13 $875,000; FY 14 $875,000; FY 15 $875,000; FY 16 $875,000; FY 17 $875,000.
Abstract: The University of Minnesota’s Research and Training Center on Community Living (RTC/CL) conducts research, training/technical assistance, and dissemination activities focused on community living and participation of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). Research studies within the RTC/CL include a policy and outcome analyses using the largest, most comprehensive data set of individual outcomes for a random sample of adults with ID/DD from 36 geographically representative states; intervention studies related participation through self-determination, social inclusion, employment, and the direct support workforce in a variety of community living service settings including family and individual homes. The RTC/CL provides a comprehensive training program that has and will continue to develop new generations of competent and skilled disability researchers and professionals. Outreach programs provide training and technical assistance to agencies and individuals across the U.S. The RTC/CL training programs include: a) the annual Reinventing Quality Conference, b) presentations at national, regional, and state conferences c) a state of the science conference, d) training and TA with national, state and local community organizations. The RTC/CL’s College of Direct Support, an acclaimed national interactive internet-based training program, train's over 390,000 DSPs each day. The RTC/CL disseminates practical information to targeted varied audiences through nationally recognized video/film productions and publications, including IMPACT, Policy Research Brief, and Frontline Initiative. RTC/CL websites provide access to its various publications and products.
Descriptors: Community living, Developmental disabilities, Direct support, Intellectual Disabilities, Self determination.


Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability in Rural Communities.
University of Montana.
52 Corbin Hall.
Missoula, MT  59812-7056.

E-mail: rural@ruralinstitute.umt.edu.
URL(s): http://rtc.ruralinstitute.umt.edu.
Principal Investigator: Tom Seekins, PhD.
Public Contact Phone: 888/268-2743 (V), 406/243-5467 (V), 406/243-4200.
Fax: 406/243-2349.
Project Number: H133B130028.
Start Date: October 1, 2013.
Length: 60 months.
NIDRR Officer: Joyce Y. Caldwell.
NIDRR Funding: FY 13 $875,000; FY 14 $875,000; FY 15 $875,000; FY 16 $875,000; FY 17 $875,000.
Abstract: The Research and Training Center on Disability in Rural Communities (RTC:Rural) at the University of Montana advances the science of rural disability and rehabilitation by finding solutions to rural issues experienced by people with disabilities (PWD) in the areas of health, employment, and community living. Current research and development projects include: Geography of Rural Disability uses GIS and national data sources (i.e. American Community Survey and Public Use Microdata Samples) to examine the distribution of PWDs and availability of services in rural communities; Ecology of Rural Disability uses longitudinal data to examine how personal and environmental factors impact community participation; Resilience in Community Participation studies factors that contribute to active community participation among PWDs; Person-Environment Fit in Rural Communities uses real-time assessment data to predict community participation; Measuring Opportunity in Rural Events creates a validated measure for assessing the accessibility of rural community events; Rural Contracted Employment Services develops recommendations for increasing employment support providers in rural communities by examining variations in provider payments structures; Social Media for Employment aims to improve use of online job search and social media strategies to improve rural employment opportunities; Rural Self-Employment Opportunities evaluates a process for increasing the skills of vocational rehabilitation counselors in the area of self-employment; Community Accessibility of Rural Environments demonstrates how community accessibility data can be used to advocate for community improvement; and Rural Mobile Health Promotion Intervention develops a mobile device application to addresses common secondary health conditions. The RTC: Rural Knowledge Translation activities communicate research findings to a broad audience through dissemination, training, and technical Assistance (TA). Dissemination includes publications, conference presentations, print and electronic mailings, websites, and social media. Specific training efforts include a state of the science conference series, development of a rural rehabilitation and disability curricula, mentoring student researchers, a rural policy series, and continued training on established projects. TA includes rapid research response to stakeholder requests; and supporting the Association of Programs for Rural Independent Living National Training and TA in rural policy issues.
Descriptors: Community living, Employment, Environmental Factors, Participation, Rural, Rural services, Technical assistance, Training.


Rehabilitation Research and Training Center for Pathways to Positive Futures: Supporting Successful Transition for Youth and Young Adults with Serious Mental Health Conditions.
Portland State University.
PO Box 751.
Portland, OR  97207-0751.

E-mail: flemingd@pdx.edu.
URL(s): http://www.pathwaysrtc.pdx.edu
https://twitter.com/pathwaysrtc
https://www.facebook.com/pathwaysrtc.
Principal Investigator: Janet Walker.
Public Contact Phone: 503/725-8313.
Fax: 503/725-4180.
Project Number: H133B090019.
Start Date: October 1, 2009.
Length: 60 months.
NIDRR Officer: Leslie J. Caplan, PhD.
NIDRR Funding: FY 09 $800,400; FY 10 $800,400; FY 11 $800,400; FY 12 $800,400; FY 13 $800,400; FY 14 $ 0.
Abstract: This project incorporates research, targeted training, and dissemination while adhering to a single conceptual framework of synthesizing research guided by an intervention approach. This framework focuses on building assets in four areas: (1) self-determination and positive identity, (2) youth- and young adult-directed decision making, (3) skills for adult roles, and (4) supportive relationships with peers and adults. The eight research projects (R1-R8) employ randomized controlled trial design, focusing on testing the efficacy of an intervention and improving outcomes for transition-age youth and young adults with serious mental health conditions. R1: My Career Vision tests an approach to career planning and employment for young adults, ages 21 to 25, who are receiving Social Security Insurance or extended special education services. R2: Better Futures tests a comprehensive intervention to assist young people in foster care with serious mental health conditions to prepare to participate in post-secondary education. R3: Achieve My Plan studies the efficacy of an approach to helping young people lead their mental health treatment planning teams, and to build service capacity to support youth engagement. Two projects develop and test assessment inventories: R4: Transition Policy Consortium develops an inventory that assesses the level of community support for transition services with a specific emphasis on measuring collaboration and continuity of care between the child and adult mental health systems; and R5: Finding Our Way furthers the development of a culturally specific self-assessment tool for American Indian/Alaskan Native youth, ages 13 to 19, and the tool is modified to include issues relevant to transition. Training, supervision, and coaching materials are produced to improve provider practice. R6: eHealth examines the ways youth and young adults use the Internet to find information about mental health care, conditions, symptoms, or medications. The R6 project identifies the kinds of information that young people look for, tracks their search processes, and assesses how they verify the accuracy of the information they find; then uses this information to develop and test an eHealth literacy curriculum. R7: Recovery Outcomes analyzes data from the System of Care National Evaluation related to young people’s recovery outcomes. R8: Mediators of Stigmatization analyzes data from nationally representative samples of youth and young adults, and uses this information to identify potentially effective anti-stigmatization strategies.
Descriptors: Behavior disorders, Children, Community integration, Emotional disorders, Mental health, Practice-based evidence, School-to-work transition, Transition, Youth.


Temple University Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Community Living and Participation of Individuals with Psychiatric Disabilities.
Temple University.
1700 North Broad Street, Suite 313.
Philadelphia, PA  19122.

E-mail: mark.salzer@temple.edu.
URL(s): http://www.tucollaborative.org.
Principal Investigator: Mark Salzer, PhD.
Public Contact Phone: 215/204-7879.
Fax: 215/204-3700.
Project Number: H133B130014.
Start Date: October 1, 2013.
Length: 60 months.
NIDRR Officer: Leslie J. Caplan, PhD.
NIDRR Funding: FY 13 $875,000; FY 14 $875,000; FY 15 $875,000; FY 16 $875,000; FY 17 $875,000.
Abstract: This project advances the development of interventions that maximize community living and participation of individuals with psychiatric disabilities through research and knowledge translation activities in partnership with consumers and other key stakeholders. This project conducts seven research studies in the areas of technology, individual and environmental factors, and interventions, and includes transition-aged youth. The research includes randomized, controlled designs; cross-sectional studies where structural equation modeling and geographic information systems technology are utilized; and epidemiological methods. This project also conducts three technical assistance, three training, and two dissemination projects.
Descriptors: Community living, Psychiatric disabilities.


Developing Strategies to Foster Community Integration and Participation (CIP) for Individuals with Traumatic Brain Injury.
The Institute for Rehabilitation and Research (TIRR).
2323 South Shepherd, Suite 907.
Houston, TX  77030.

E-mail: angelle.sander@memorialhermann.org.
URL(s): http://www.tbicommunity.org/
https://www.facebook.com/birc.tbicommunity
https://twitter.com/TBICommunity.
Principal Investigator: Angelle M. Sander, PhD.
Public Contact Phone: 713/630-0516.
Fax: 713/630-0529.
Project Number: H133B090023.
Start Date: October 1, 2009.
Length: 60 months.
NIDRR Officer: Kenneth D. Wood, PhD.
NIDRR Funding: FY 09 $849,956; FY 10 $849,968; FY 11 $849,955; FY 12 $849,966; FY 13 $849,980; FY 14 $ 0.
Abstract: This rehabilitation research and training center conducts three research projects and five training projects, providing a comprehensive approach to improving participation in all areas of community integration for all persons with traumatic brain injury (TBI), including minorities. Research Project 1 is a randomized controlled trial of a community-based contextualized intervention to improve memory and memory-related participation activities. This trial compares the effectiveness of a contextualized memory intervention provided in the participant’s home to standard instruction in use of a memory notebook for improving functional memory and community participation. Research Project 2 is a randomized controlled trial of an extended case coordination service to maximize access to and benefit from state vocational rehabilitation services. This trial compares employment outcomes for persons receiving a case coordination intervention to those only receiving a referral for state vocational rehabilitation services. Research Project 3 develops a comprehensive list of symptoms of TBI, and based on this list, creates a classification system for persons with TBI utilizing symptoms, barriers, and facilitators for community integration. This system deploys an innovative, user-friendly, web-based application. Training and technical assistance activities facilitate the widespread dissemination of educational materials on evidence-based strategies for improving function and participation after TBI. Training projects focus on increasing capacity for social networking and on providing education to persons with TBI, caregivers, and treating clinicians, in order to maximize community participation. Training is also conducted in use of the classification system to assist researchers and clinicians in allocating persons with TBI to appropriate treatments. Technical assistance activities are also conducted to improve implementation of training activities and to maximize resulting community integration.
Descriptors: Attitudinal barriers, Brain injuries, Community integration, Community participation, Employment outcomes, Minorities.


Disability Demographics.

Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Statistics and Demographics (StatsRRTC).
University of New Hampshire.
10 West Edge Drive, Suite 101.
Durham, NH  03824.

E-mail: disability.statistics@unh.edu.
URL(s): http://www.disabilitycompendium.org
http://www.researchondisability.org/statsrrtc.
Principal Investigator: Andrew J. Houtenville, PhD.
Public Contact Phone: 603/864-0165.
Fax: 603/863-0555.
Project Number: H133B130015.
Start Date: October 1, 2013.
Length: 60 months.
NIDRR Officer: Hugh Berry, EdD.
NIDRR Funding: FY 13 $874,998; FY 14 $875,000; FY 15 $874,999; FY 16 $874,998; FY 17 $874,998.
Abstract: The objective of the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Statistics and Demographics (StatsRRTC) is to narrow and actively bridge the divide between the producers and end users of disability statistics. In pursuit of this objective, the RRTC conducts 12 research and 15 knowledge translation projects that build upon the work of past StatsRRTC projects. Several of the research projects focus on the collection of disability statistics and narrow the divide by (a) developing recommendations and tools that improve the identification of the population with disabilities and measurement of services, and (b) conducting experiments to test alternative survey methods. Project activities include (a) analyzing existing data to assess progress towards national goals and address information needs about critical programs; (b) providing access to timely and relevant disability statistics through national and state-level Annual Reports on Disability that track key indicators and an Annual Disability Statistics Compendium that allows end users to access even more statistics; (c) providing technical assistance to key stakeholders to produce customized statistical analyses and compilations; (d) developing and maintaining a State/Local Statistics which allows users to create customized reports; (e) providing information and referral services, and technical consultation on collection methods and data analysis; and (f) increasing the capacity of end users to effectively utilize disability statistics through the Annual Report and Compendium Rollout event, online training courses for VR evaluators, and the Center’s State-of-the-Science conference.
Descriptors: Knowledge translation, Statistics.


Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Statistics and Demographics.
Kessler Foundation.
300 Executive Drive, Suite 70.
West Orange, NJ  07052.

E-mail: disability.statistics@unh.edu.
URL(s): http://www.researchondisability.org/statsrrtc.
Principal Investigator: Elizabeth Cardoso, PhD; Andrew Houtenville, PhD; John O'Neill, PhD.
Public Contact Phone: 866/538-9521.
Fax: 603/862-0555.
Project Number: H133B120006.
Start Date: October 1, 2012.
Length: 12 months.
NIDRR Officer: Hugh Berry, EdD.
NIDRR Funding: FY 12 $850,000; FY 13 $ 0; FY 14 $ 0.
Abstract: The Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Statistics and Demographics (StatsRRTC) facilitates evidence-based decision making in many different service and policy arenas to benefit persons with disabilities, leading to improved education and employment outcomes. StatsRRTC is a collaborative effort that brings together the lead investigators from three current RRTCs: the StatsRRTC, Employment Service System RRTC, and Employment Policy RRTC; and partners them with leaders in the disability advocacy community from the American Association of People with Disabilities and leaders in vocational rehabilitation from the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation. Project activities include: (1) producing a set of guides to and meta-analyses of existing survey and administrative data sources; (2) conducting experiments to test alternative survey methods; (3) expanding and distributing the Annual Disability Statistics Compendium; (4) expanding and revising the Source Guide for Surveying People with Disabilities; (5) providing an information and referral technical assistance service; (6) providing stylized statistical estimates and methodological consulting for key stakeholders as a follow-up to outreach and training activities; and (7) conducting training designed to build capacity among consumers and within the vocational rehabilitation system and other support services systems related to data collection and analysis, secondary data analysis, and reporting processes. Project goals include: improving the knowledge of and access to existing data; generating the knowledge needed to improve future disability data collection; and strengthening connections between the data from and regarding respondents, researchers, and decision makers.
Descriptors: Demographics, Disability statistics, Education, Employment, Evidence-based practice, Statistics.


Employment Outcomes.

Improved Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Psychiatric Disabilities.
Boston University.
940 Commonwealth Avenue West.
Boston, MA  02215-1203.

E-mail: mfarkas@bu.edu  erogers@bu.edu.
URL(s): http://cpr.bu.edu/research/current-research/rrtc-2009-2014
https://www.facebook.com/BUCPR.
Principal Investigator: Marianne Farkas, ScD; E. Sally Rogers, ScD.
Public Contact Phone: 617/353-3549.
Fax: 617/353-7700.
Project Number: H133B090014.
Start Date: October 1, 2009.
Length: 60 months.
NIDRR Officer: Leslie J. Caplan, PhD.
NIDRR Funding: FY 09 $849,535; FY 10 $850,000; FY 11 $847,289; FY 12 $850,000; FY 13 $848,218; FY 14 $ 0.
Abstract: This project develops and tests innovative interventions, identifies barriers to and facilitators of effective partnerships among providers of employment services, and develops and tests adaptations of evidence-based employment interventions for individuals with psychiatric disabilities from traditionally underserved groups. Additionally, this project incorporates research findings into practice and policy by developing, evaluating, and implementing strategies to increase their utilization; and conducts training, technical assistance, and dissemination activities (TDTA) with the same purpose. TDTA projects are organized into programmatic areas which together focus on the development and implementation of practices and services to improve employment outcomes. Using the knowledge transfer framework, TDTA projects produce usable, new technologies for improving employment outcomes.
Descriptors: Employment, Evidence-based practice, Intervention, Outcomes, Psychiatric disabilities, Rehabilitation, Underserved populations, Utilization.


Learning and Working During the Transition to Adulthood.
University of Massachusetts Medical School.
UMMS 55 Lake Avenue.
Worcester, MA  01655.

E-mail: maryann.davis@umassmed.edu.
URL(s): http://labs.umassmed.edu/transitionsRTC
https://www.facebook.com/TransitionsRTC
http://voices4hope.tumblr.com/
http://www.youtube.com/user/TransitionsRTC
https://twitter.com/transitionsrtc.
Principal Investigator: Maryann Davis, PhD.
Public Contact Phone: 508/856-8718.
Fax: 508/856-8700.
Project Number: H133B090018.
Start Date: October 1, 2009.
Length: 60 months.
NIDRR Officer: Leslie J. Caplan, PhD.
NIDRR Funding: FY 09 $800,398; FY 10 $800,398; FY 11 $800,392; FY 12 $800,380; FY 13 $800,388; FY 14 $ 0.
Abstract: This project focuses on school-to-work transitions and develops an integrated research program examining this developmental stage for transition age youth and young adults with serious mental health conditions. The Learning and Working During the Transition to Adulthood Rehabilitation Research and Training Center provides national leadership in this area and shares developing knowledge with key stakeholders including youth and young adults, their families, researchers, policymakers, and practitioners. The transition to adulthood is a critical life stage when the learning that occurs, both in school and in the larger world, lays an important foundation for individuals’ future work life. Serious psychiatric disability issues can disrupt the school-to-work pathway and contribute to school dropout, psychiatric hospitalization, homelessness, and jail. The Center develops and translates knowledge from state-of-the-art rigorous research on education and work experiences for 14-30 year olds. The research is informed by consumer and family input and is carried out in real-world settings. This project contributes to new knowledge about interventions for this population who are often from disadvantaged backgrounds, and improves coordination between child and adult mental health services. The translation of this knowledge speeds capacity building for service providers and the movement of findings into practice and policy.
Descriptors: Learning, Mental disabilities, School-to-work transition, Work transition.


Vocational Rehabilitation and Developing Strategies to Meet Employer Needs in Changing Economic Environments.
University of Massachusetts Boston.
100 Morrissey Boulevard.
Boston, MA  02125-3393.

E-mail: susan.foley@umb.edu.
URL(s): http://vr-rrtc.org/demandside/.
Principal Investigator: Susan Foley, PhD.
Public Contact Phone: 617/287-4317.
Project Number: H133B120002.
Start Date: October 1, 2012.
Length: 60 months.
NIDRR Officer: Hugh Berry, EdD.
NIDRR Funding: FY 12 $650,000; FY 13 $650,000; FY 14 $650,000; FY 15 $650,000; FY 16 $650,000.
Abstract: This center produces strategies for assessing employer needs and expectations, develops strategic planning models that support state vocational rehabilitation (VR) agency efforts to anticipate and prepare for changing employer and labor market needs, identifies existing programs that may be useful to VR agencies, and produces methods for tracking, analyzing and reacting to changing employer needs. Research, training, technical assistance, and dissemination activities build upon current knowledge of demand-side strategies and fill a knowledge gap on agency-level practices to address three main themes in improving VR responsiveness to employer needs: (1) integrating labor market and business relations data into business intelligence and strategic planning efforts in Alabama; (2) aligning just-in-time job training with industry needs to ameliorate middle skill labor shortages in Nebraska; and (3) testing an emerging and piloted model in four state VR agencies of “no-risk, low risk” dual customer job placement services created in Vermont. This project is a partnership with The Institute for Community Inclusion at the University of Massachusetts Boston, the Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services, the Nebraska Vocational Rehabilitation, the Vermont Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, and the New England Council.
Descriptors: Employment, Employment economics, Vocational rehabilitation.


RRTC on Employment Outcomes for Individuals Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired.
Mississippi State University.
PO Box 6189
108 Herbert South, Room 150
IED Building.
Mississippi State, MS  39762.

E-mail: mcapella@colled.msstate.edu.
URL(s): http://www.blind.msstate.edu
https://www.facebook.com/msu.nrtc.
Principal Investigator: Michele Capella McDonnall, PhD; Brenda Cavenaugh, PhD; Adele Crudden; Marty Giesen; B.J. LeJeune.
Public Contact Phone: 662/325-2001.
Project Number: H133B100022.
Start Date: October 1, 2010.
Length: 60 months.
NIDRR Officer: Hugh Berry, EdD.
NIDRR Funding: FY 10 $850,000; FY 11 $850,000; FY 12 $850,000; FY 13 $850,000; FY 14 $850,000.
Abstract: The overall purpose of this project is to improve competitive employment outcomes for persons who are blind or visually impaired (B/VI). Project 1 involves developing, implementing, and evaluating a customized transportation intervention through a state-federal vocational rehabilitation agency. Project 2 involves modifying an existing business mentoring program for college seniors. Project 3 evaluates existing practices used by vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies to interact with employers, with a focus on their use of the model of business development. Project 4 involves an evaluation of the Randolph-Sheppard Program that includes evaluating managerial skills, training needs, and recruitment strategies. Project 5 evaluates the VR service delivery process and outcomes for B/VI consumers who are SSDI beneficiaries. Project 6 involves evaluating the accessibility and usability of two important workplace devices that have known accessibility issues for persons who are B/VI: multifunctional document centers and business internet telephone systems. Training, technical assistance, and dissemination activities flow from the results of the six research projects and include a State of the Science conference held in Year Four. A large number of outputs and outcomes emanate from this project. Example of outputs are a minimum of 13 peer-reviewed publications, 18 conference presentations, 2 intervention manuals, 2 evidence-based practice guidelines, and 7 training webinars. Important overall project outcomes resulting from these outputs include increased knowledge about the effectiveness of existing practices and new interventions, utilization of research findings in the development of rehabilitation practices and policies, and improved employment outcomes for persons who are B/VI.
Descriptors: Blind, Employment, Outcomes, Visual impairments.


RRTC on Employment Policy and Measurement.
University of New Hampshire.
15 Academic Way, McConnell Hall.
Durham, NH  03824.

E-mail: andrew.houtenville@unh.edu.
URL(s): http://www.researchondisability.org/epm-rrtc.
Principal Investigator: Andrew J. Houtenville, PhD.
Public Contact Phone: 603/862-4004.
Fax: 603/862-0555.
Project Number: H133B100030.
Start Date: October 1, 2010.
Length: 60 months.
NIDRR Officer: Hugh Berry, EdD.
NIDRR Funding: FY 10 $850,000; FY 11 $850,000; FY 12 $850,000; FY 13 $850,000; FY 14 $850,000.
Abstract: This project investigates the impact of government policies and programs on employment, with particular attention to the effects of program interactions; examines new ways of measuring employment outcome; and facilitates the translation of research findings into policymaking and program administration. The project includes a comprehensive set of 13 research projects, focusing on interactions among government programs and employment measurement. These projects utilize cross-sectional and longitudinal data derived from several sources: national surveys, program administrative records, administrative records linked across programs, and/or surveys linked to administrative records. The researchers at the Rehabilitation Research Training Center on Employment Policy and Measurement are conducting an integrated set of knowledge translation projects designed to convey research findings to key stakeholders and work with these stakeholders to develop research-to-policy implementation strategies.
Descriptors: Employment, Measurement, Policy.


Rehabilitation Research and Training Center: Individual-Level Characteristics Related to Employment Among Individuals with Disabilities.
Kessler Foundation.
300 Executive Drive, Suite 70.
West Orange, NJ  07052.

E-mail: joneil@kesslerfoundation.org.
URL(s): http://www.researchondisability.org/ic-rrtc.
Principal Investigator: John O'Neill, PhD; Purvi Sevak, PhD.
Public Contact Phone: 973/324-8387.
Fax: 973/324-8373.
Project Number: H133B120005.
Start Date: October 1, 2012.
Length: 36 months.
NIDRR Officer: Hugh Berry, EdD.
NIDRR Funding: FY 12 $850,000; FY 13 $850,000; FY 14 $850,000.
Abstract: This RRTC generates new knowledge regarding the economic disparities of individuals with disabilities and the role of individual characteristics, building upon evidence-based research that improves strategies and interventions for attaining better employment outcomes for the various subpopulations of people with disabilities. This project blends the social model of disability with labor economic theory, adopting the framework of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health focusing on three research domains: health conditions, personal characteristics, and environmental characteristics. The first domain, health conditions, researches the physical and mental characteristics that underlie disability. The second domain researches personal characteristics including demographic characteristics, human capital (education and training), and social capital (an individual’s family, community, and employment relationships). The third domain researches environmental characteristics including accessibility, transportation, the local economy, public policies, and geography. This project conducts research in three phases: Phase 1 - reviewing existing literature and providing comprehensive review of the vocational rehabilitation and social science literature on facilitators and barriers to employment for persons with disabilities; Phase 2 - utilizing existing data from Phase 1 and data from disability-related public programs and national and international surveys to examine the geographic and individual variation within the data supporting identification of individual, social, economic, and environmental barriers and facilitators to employment; and Phase 3 - applying new data to design, implement, and analyze the National Survey on Disability and Employment.
Descriptors: Community-based services, Employment, Service delivery, Vocational rehabilitation.


Cornell RRTC on Employer Practices Related to Employment Outcomes Among Individuals with Disabilities.
Cornell University.
201 ILR Extension Building.
Ithaca, NY  14853-3901.

E-mail: smb23@cornell.edu.
URL(s): http://www.employerpracticesrrtc.org.
Principal Investigator: Susanne M. Bruyère, PhD.
Public Contact Phone: 607/255-9536 (V), 607/255-2891 (TTY).
Fax: 607/255-2763.
Project Number: H133B100017.
Start Date: October 1, 2010.
Length: 60 months.
NIDRR Officer: Leslie J. Caplan, PhD.
NIDRR Funding: FY 10 $800,000; FY 11 $800,000; FY 12 $800,000; FY 13 $800,000; FY 14 $800,000.
Abstract: This RRTC creates new knowledge of specific employer practices most strongly associated with desired employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities and the prevalence of these practices; increases knowledge about how these practices relate to employer success in hiring, retention, and promotion of individuals with disabilities; and increases the incorporation of these findings into practice and policy by collaborating with employer groups to develop, evaluate, or implement strategies to promote utilization of positive practices as identified by the project. Project goals are reached through a series of 13 research and 14 outreach projects. Specifically, rigorous research is conducted (1) using national survey and administrative data sets with employer variables; (2) focus groups and network-wide surveys with partner employer member organizations; (3) in-depth employer case studies in at least one private and one public employer workplace to identify barriers to best practices implementation, as well as practices that cultivate inclusive climates for people with disabilities; and finally, (4) designing and testing an online employer best practices benchmarking tool based on research results. Through research and outreach projects, this project expands the availability and accessibility of useful information on how employer practices are related to employer success in hiring, retaining, and advancing people with disabilities.
Descriptors: Employers, Employment outcomes, Outcomes.


Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Employment of Individuals with Physical Disabilities.
Virginia Commonwealth University.
1314 West Main Street, Box 842011.
Richmond, VA  23284-2011.

E-mail: kinge@vcu.edu.
URL(s): http://www.vcurrtc.org.
Principal Investigator: Paul Wehman, PhD.
Public Contact Phone: 804/828-1851.
Fax: 804/828-2193.
Project Number: H133B130011.
Start Date: October 1, 2013.
Length: 60 months.
NIDRR Officer: Hugh Berry, EdD.
NIDRR Funding: FY 13 $873,811; FY 14 $862,741; FY 15 $871,087; FY 16 $874,918; FY 17 $871,129.
Abstract: This project is developing and implementing five research studies that directly impact the employment outcomes of individuals with physical disabilities. These studies focus on: (1) technology that improves employment outcomes for individuals with physical disabilities; (2) individual and environmental factors associated with improved employment outcomes; (3) interventions that contribute to improved employment outcomes; (4) effects of government practices, policies, and programs on employment outcomes; and (5) practices and policies that contribute to the improved outcomes for transition-aged youth and young adults with physical disabilities. The activities of this project include: (1) conducting a mixed-method, quasi-experimental study to identify the barriers and facilitators of employment for individuals with physical disabilities and testing the effectiveness of specific knowledge translation strategies used by individuals with physical disabilities to promote the use of employment disability research findings; (2) conducting research on customized employment to identify evidence-based practices that will facilitate the employment of transition-age youth with physical disabilities; (3) conducting research on the employment of veterans with amputation conditions; (4) conducting research to evaluate demand-side employment and a toolkit for use by rehabilitation professionals; 5)studying successful employment and quality of work life after severe disability for individuals with multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury; and (6)establishing and maintaining a National Resource Center for individuals with physical disabilities and their families that is guided by Rehabilitation Research and Training Center research. This project is a collaboration of VCU, the Medical University of South Carolina, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Descriptors: Employment, Employment outcomes, Evidence-based practice, Physical disabilities.


Creating Evidence-Based Vocational Rehabilitation Service Delivery Practices.
The Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System.
1000 Bascom Mall, Room 403.
Madison, WI  53706.

E-mail: chan@education.wisc.edu.
URL(s): http://research2vrpractice.org/
http://www.youtube.com/user/research2vrpractice.
Principal Investigator: Fong Chan, PhD; John Lui, PhD.
Public Contact Phone: 608/262-2137.
Project Number: H133B100034.
Start Date: October 1, 2010.
Length: 60 months.
NIDRR Officer: Leslie J. Caplan, PhD.
NIDRR Funding: FY 10 $942,082; FY 11 $918,828; FY 12 $935,201; FY 13 $929,632; FY 14 $939,710.
Abstract: This rehabilitation research and training center for evidence based practice in vocational rehabilitation (RRTC-EBP VR) generates new knowledge related to theory-driven, evidence-based vocational rehabilitation (VR) practice to improve the effectiveness of VR service delivery practice generally and to improve employment outcomes of subpopulations of VR customers with the lowest outcomes. The project includes three research phases. During the first phase, RSA-911 and related data are analyzed to examine organizational level variables (e.g., state unemployment rates) and individual level data (e.g., race and disability type) to determine personal and environmental interactions and their associations with quality of employment outcomes using multi-level analysis. The second phase includes in-depth case study of two exemplary VR agencies, comparing them with other VR agencies to identify promising practices. In the third phase, new data fill gaps identified in Phase 1 and 2 through collection of new data. Major Phase 3 projects include validating the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health as a VR model, testing a motivational enhancement model for VR, evaluating the effectiveness of a motivational interviewing intervention, and conducting a controlled study on a counselors’ toolkit for incorporating evidence-based VR practices. In addition, Phase 3 includes a national survey to determine readiness of state VR to incorporate evidence-based interventions in service delivery practice.
Descriptors: Evidence-based practice, Service delivery, Service models, Vocational rehabilitation.


Health and Function.

Rehabilitation Research and Training Center in Neuromuscular Diseases (RRTC-NMD).
University of California at Davis.
4860 Y Street, Suite 3850
UC Medical Center.
Sacramento, CA  95817-2307.

E-mail: karen.boerner@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu.
URL(s): http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/pmr/research/index.html.
Principal Investigator: Craig M. McDonald, MD.
Public Contact Phone: 916/734-4280.
Fax: 916/734-7838.
Project Number: H133B090001.
Start Date: October 1, 2009.
Length: 60 months.
NIDRR Officer: Theresa San Agustin, MD.
NIDRR Funding: FY 09 $800,000; FY 10 $800,000; FY 11 $800,000; FY 12 $799,999; FY 13 $ 1; FY 14 $ 0.
Abstract: The Rehabilitation Research and Training Center in Neuromuscular Diseases (RRTC-NMD) has five goals: (1) develop and test improved outcome measures for use in intervention and natural history studies in persons with neuromuscular diseases (NMDs); (2) identify or develop and test the effectiveness of new medical rehabilitation interventions, and document the effectiveness of existing interventions, in persons with NMDs; (3) provide training, including graduate, pre-service, and in-service training, to help rehabilitation personnel effectively provide rehabilitation services to individuals with NMDs; (4) disseminate informational materials and provide technical assistance to individuals with NMDs, their representatives, providers, and other interested parties; and (5) serve as a national center of excellence in rehabilitation research for individuals with disabilities, their representatives, providers, and other interested parties. The RRTC-NMD conducts four research projects related to developing improved outcome measures. In Project 1, both currently used and novel clinical endpoints related to mobility and secondary conditions are studied. The clinical meaningfulness of those outcome measures are assessed in comparison to a new person-reported outcome measure (the NeuroQOL) which addresses impaired mobility, and decreased self-care due to weakness, pain, and fatigue. In Project 2, the NeuroQOL instrument is further refined and validated for children 5 to 12 years of age who are commonly targeted for new interventions. Projects 3 and 4 evaluate novel and existing medical rehabilitation interventions in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Project 3 uses a multicenter prospective natural history study of 347 individuals with DMD to evaluate existing medical rehabilitation interventions designed to enhance mobility and reduce the severity of secondary conditions. Project 4 examines the uses of a first-in-class medication to maintain or improve function in patients with DMD who have a premature stop codon mutation. Project 4 also focuses on individuals severely affected with DMD who are non-ambulatory and evaluates ataluren and its effects on mobility/upper extremity function, secondary conditions, and health-related quality of life.
Descriptors: Health promotion, Intervention, Medical rehabilitation, Neuromuscular diseases, Rehabilitation research.


Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Secondary Conditions in Spinal Cord Injury.
MedStar Health Research Institute.
102 Irving Street, NW.
Washington, DC  20010.

E-mail: inger.h.ljungberg@medstar.net.
URL(s): http://sci-health.org
http://www.youtube.com/user/HealthyTomorrow
https://www.facebook.com/rrtcsci.
Principal Investigator: Suzanne L. Groah, MD.
Public Contact Phone: 202/877-1694.
Fax: 202/726-7521.
Project Number: H133B090002.
Start Date: October 1, 2009.
Length: 60 months.
NIDRR Officer: Pimjai Sudsawad, ScD.
NIDRR Funding: FY 09 $799,995; FY 10 $799,998; FY 11 $799,998; FY 12 $799,999; FY 13 $800,000; FY 14 $ 0.
Abstract: This RRTC focuses on the frequent and costly complications of obesity such as cardiometabolic syndrome (inclusive of obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and inflammation), and pressure ulcers among people with spinal cord injury (SCI), with a specific focus on the underserved. Utilizing novel diagnostic and therapeutic practices, this RRTC addresses three major secondary conditions that lead to significant health decay in people with SCI. This RRTC includes three research (R1-R3) and training (T1-T3) projects. Project R1 determines the degree to which obesity is related to cardiometabolic health, cardiometabolic risk (CMR) factors, and atherosclerotic burden. Those requiring intervention based on CMR profile and atherosclerotic burden in R1 are selected to participate in Project R2, a randomized control trial examining impact of an omega-3 dietary supplement intervention. Project R3 determines the physiologic response of sacral and ischial skin to sitting and pressure relief. A behavioral self-management program is assessed to ensure future recommendations can be evidence-based. These research findings feed into three training activities that include culturally sensitive consumer education: T1 emphasizes underserved populations, T2 emphasizes professional training and education of rehabilitation and non-rehabilitation professionals utilizing online media, and T3 emphasizes dissemination through a state-of-science research and training conference.
Descriptors: Health promotion, Interventions, Secondary conditions, Spinal cord injuries.


RRTC on Psychiatric Disability and Co-occurring Medical Conditions.
University of Illinois at Chicago.
1601 West Taylor Street, 4th Floor, M/C 912.
Chicago, IL  60612.

E-mail: jonikas@psych.uic.edu.
URL(s): http://www.cmhsrp.uic.edu/health/
https://www.facebook.com/UICHealthRRTC
https://twitter.com/UICHealthRRTC.
Principal Investigator: Judith A. Cook, PhD.
Public Contact Phone: 312/355-1696 (V), 312/422-0706 (TTY).
Fax: 312/355-4189.
Project Number: H133B100028.
Start Date: October 1, 2010.
Length: 60 months.
NIDRR Officer: Leslie J. Caplan, PhD.
NIDRR Funding: FY 10 $649,976; FY 11 $649,976; FY 12 $649,976; FY 13 $649,962; FY 14 $649,976.
Abstract: The Rehabilitation Research Training Center (RRTC) on Psychiatric Disability and Co-occurring Medical Conditions conducts a series of projects to identify and reduce health disparities among people with psychiatric disabilities while promoting wellness and recovery, enhancing employment outcomes, and providing targeted education and training. Research projects include a seven-state health screening of people with psychiatric disabilities to estimate the prevalence of medical co-morbidities and people’s health care needs. Also included are two randomized controlled trial studies on: (1) an electronic decision support system to motivate smoking cessation treatment, and (2) the Georgia Peer Support Whole Health model to determine its effectiveness in helping people set and achieve personal health goals. Another project involves assessment of the impact of using a disease registry to improve health and mental health care coordination for people with co-occurring diabetes and psychiatric disabilities. The final research project involves developing and testing a new model combining evidence-based practice-supported employment with peer wellness promotion. Training projects include adaptation of an evidence-based weight management intervention into a curricular format for use by clinicians and peer providers, as well as a how-to health screening manual to be tested in three locations to promote public policy shifts that improve medical care. Another program equips medical students and residents with knowledge about evidence-based medicine when treating co-occurring psychiatric disability and medical conditions, while another project explores the utility of an electronic performance-tracking and outcomes-monitoring system linking statewide peer-run self-help centers. Also offered is an on-line instructional program, as well as the creation and evaluation of a web-based employee wellness program for a peer workforce employed in five states. Also included is a project to create large-scale system change by using Medicaid dollars to fund peer-delivered illness prevention and health promotion services. Finally, the Center is convening a state-of-the-science national conference in 2014 resulting in a comprehensive report.
Descriptors: Evidence-based practice, Health promotion, Psychiatric disabilities, Rehabilitation research.


Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Developmental Disabilities and Health.
University of Illinois at Chicago.
1640 West Roosevelt Road.
Chicago, IL  60608-6904.

URL(s): http://www.rrtcdd.org
http://healthmattersprogram.org.
Principal Investigator: Tamar Heller, PhD.
Public Contact Phone: 312/413-1647 (V), 800/996-8845 (V), 312/413-0453 (TTY).
Fax: 312/996-6942.
Project Number: H133B130007.
Start Date: October 1, 2013.
Length: 60 months.
NIDRR Officer: Dawn Carlson, PhD, MPH.
NIDRR Funding: FY 13 $874,992; FY 14 $874,992; FY 15 $874,999; FY 16 $874,992; FY 17 $874,994.
Abstract: This project enhances the health and function of adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) over their lifespan through a coordinated set of research, training, technical assistance, and dissemination activities. The goals of the center are to (1) increase the understanding of health status, health access, and health behaviors of adolescents and adults with IDD; (2) improve the health and function of persons with IDD through health promotion interventions; and (3) improve health care access through integrated care practices. Research activities include, but are not limited to, national database analyses of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, the National Health Interview Survey, Survey of Child Special Health Care Needs, and the Survey of Adult Transition and Health; a continuing prospective cohort study of health behaviors on health and function over a 10-year period, including minorities with IDD; the development of a technology based intervention to reduce obesity; and evaluation of the scaling up of the evidence-based “Health Matters” exercise and nutrition program for individuals with IDD developed by the project, under a previous grant. The Center includes a prospective study to assess the impact of changes in health and long-term practices to health and function, health care access, preventative services, and satisfaction of adults with IDD in the process of a change from fee-for-service to integrated health and long-term care with specific analyses targeting persons with diabetes, heart disease, and Alzheimer’s disease. The project’s innovative training and technical assistance approaches include (1) dissemination through national provider, professional, and consumer collaborations; (2) development of user-friendly products in various formats; (3) use of the train-the-trainer and peer training models to promote local ownership of effective practices; (4) targeted promotion of systemic changes that maintain programmatic and policy changes; (5) leadership in national task forces; and (6) use of web-based technologies to provide global access to knowledge and training products, including dissemination through the project’s website, the National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability, and the Health Matters Program; and (7) provision of certificate programs in disability and health promotion. This project continues its leadership role in increasing the self-determination of adults with IDD and their families by involving consumers in all phases of its research, training, and dissemination activities.
Descriptors: Developmental disabilities, Health care, Health promotion, Intellectual Disabilities, Self determination.


Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Interventions for Children and Youth with TBI.
Children’s Hospital Medical Center.
3333 Burnet Avenue.
Cincinnati, OH  45229.

E-mail: shari.wade@cchmc.org.
URL(s): http://www.tbifocus.org.
Principal Investigator: Shari L. Wade, PhD.
Public Contact Phone: 513/636-3370.
Fax: 513/636-7360.
Project Number: H133B090010.
Start Date: October 1, 2009.
Length: 60 months.
NIDRR Officer: A. Cate Miller, PhD.
NIDRR Funding: FY 09 $799,337; FY 10 $799,915; FY 11 $799,884; FY 12 $799,542; FY 13 $799,682; FY 14 $ 0.
Abstract: This project addresses the need for interventions for children and youth with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Interventions designed for this population must: (a) target the continuum of service delivery; (b) address the changing needs of the population; and most importantly, (c) include tools, training activities, and dissemination mechanisms for all of the “everyday” people who support children and youth. Project research identifies a reliable and valid measurement battery for assessing functional improvements arising from TBI interventions; and initiates a national, shared database of TBI outcomes data. This RRTC: (1) evaluates specific interventions to improve cognitive, behavioral, and psychosocial outcomes with a range of children and youth with TBI through randomized clinical trials; (2) evaluates the effectiveness of the validated interventions in natural settings; and (3) uses multi-method evaluations of the efficacy of training, technical assistance, and dissemination activities to verify the utility of the final products.
Descriptors: Brain injuries, Children, Interventions, Service delivery, Youth.


Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Secondary Conditions in Individuals with SCI.
Medical University of South Carolina.
77 President Street, Suite C101
MSC 700.
Charleston, SC  29425.

E-mail: swayngim@musc.edu.
URL(s): http://www.longevityafterinjury.com
http://academicdepartments.musc.edu/chp/longevity_after_injury/funded_projects/rrtc/
http://sciandtbiresearch.blogspot.com/
http://www.facebook.com/longevityafterinjuryproject
http://www.linkedin.com/groups/MUSC-Longevity-after-Injury-Project-5043886?trk=myg_ugrp_ovr.
Principal Investigator: James S. Krause, PhD; Lee L. Saunders, PhD.
Public Contact Phone: 843/792-7051.
Fax: 843/792-5649.
Project Number: H133B090005.
Start Date: October 1, 2009.
Length: 60 months.
NIDRR Officer: Pimjai Sudsawad, ScD.
NIDRR Funding: FY 09 $794,504; FY 10 $797,646; FY 11 $791,037; FY 12 $794,494; FY 13 $786,639; FY 14 $ 0.
Abstract: This Rehabilitation Research and Training Center combines an integrated program of research to identify risk and protective factors for secondary conditions in spinal cord injury (SCI) with a systematic program of education, training, dissemination, and technical assistance. This program allows new knowledge to be directly translated into prevention strategies at the policy, rehabilitative, clinical, community, and individual consumer levels. The key to prevention of secondary conditions is to first identify to whom they occur and why, then to widely educate and disseminate new knowledge to professionals and consumers in a format they can directly use in the prevention of secondary conditions. Through three research studies, integrating two theoretical models of risk of secondary conditions, the project identifies the risk and protective factors that put the greatest number of individuals at risk for the greatest number of conditions. Study 1 is a longitudinal follow-up of 1,755 participants who completed an extensive assessment of risk and protective factors for secondary conditions that include adverse events (e.g., pressure ulcers, hospitalizations), chronic conditions (e.g., pain, fatigue), and psychosocial conditions (e.g., depressive disorder). The study examines the stability of secondary conditions and identifies psychological, environmental, and behavioral predictors of future episodes of secondary conditions. Study 2 identifies the association of access to health services, including initial rehabilitation services (i.e., inpatient, outpatient only, no rehabilitation), with presence of secondary conditions. By using a population-based cohort, this study identifies the role of access to services among those with the fewest resources as they are at greatest risk for secondary conditions. Study 3 utilizes a 17-year follow-up among 845 participants from Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center to investigate the stability of metabolic syndrome over time and its relationship with secondary conditions including pain, fatigue, and a depressive disorder.
Descriptors: Prevention, Research and training centers, Risk Assessment, Secondary conditions, Spinal cord injuries.


University of Washington Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Promoting Healthy Aging for Individuals with Long-Term Physical Disabilities.
University of Washington.
1959 NE Pacific Street.
Seattle, WA  98195.

E-mail: agerrtc@uw.edu.
URL(s): http://agerrtc.washington.edu
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Healthy-Aging-RRTC/308875452523165
https://twitter.com/AgingRRTC.
Principal Investigator: Ivan, Molton, PhD.
Public Contact Phone: 866/928-2114.
Fax: 206/685-3244.
Project Number: H133B130018.
Start Date: October 1, 2013.
Length: 60 months.
NIDRR Officer: Margaret Campbell, PhD.
NIDRR Funding: FY 13 $875,000; FY 14 $875,000; FY 15 $875,000; FY 16 $875,000; FY 17 $875,000.
Abstract: This project is devoted to better understanding the factors associated with healthy aging in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI), multiple sclerosis (MS), late effects of polio (PPS), and muscular dystrophy (MD). Research activities focus on the impact of secondary conditions and barriers to health care access; testing the feasibility of community-based health and wellness intervention to promote healthy aging in persons with SCI, MS, PPS, and MD; developing an intervention to promote positive psychological adjustment in persons with MS; enhancing understanding of the effect of federal programs such as Medicaid Managed Care on receipt of and satisfaction with health care services; and serving as a national resource center on aging with long-term physical disabilities. Four interrelated scientific studies on healthy aging and disability make up this project and are conducted with the full involvement of consumers and key stakeholder groups. Project I continues a recently-completed, longitudinal survey of 1,600 individuals with long-term physical disabilities, creating the largest longitudinal database of secondary health conditions in the target population. Project II tests the efficacy of an existing, empirically supported health and wellness intervention in promoting healthy aging for adults with SCI, MS, MD, or PPS in collaboration with a large, regional community senior services agency. Project III develops and pilot tests a novel intervention designed to promote positive psychological factors that are key to healthy aging in individuals with MS. Project IV builds on an existing study of Medicaid Managed Care to evaluate the impact of Medicaid managed Care on health care utilization, function, and consumer satisfaction in a sample of more than 14,000 individuals with long-term physical disabilities. Dissemination activities include (1) holding a state-of-the-science conference on aging with disabilities; (2) publishing the findings from the studies in national and international journals; and (3) presenting the findings at high profile scientific conferences in the field. This project plans for knowledge translation to occur through pre-service curricula, national consumer organizations, and web-based platforms.
Descriptors: Aging, Multiple sclerosis, Muscular dystrophy, Physical disabilities, Post-polio syndrome, Spinal cord injuries.


Knowledge Translation.

Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Improving Measurement of Medical Rehabilitation Outcomes.
Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago (RIC).
345 East Superior Street.
Chicago, IL  60611.

E-mail: a-heinemann@northwestern.edu.
URL(s): http://www.ric.org/research/centers/cror/
https://www.facebook.com/RehabOutcomes.
Principal Investigator: Allen W. Heinemann, PhD.
Public Contact Phone: 312/238-2802.
Fax: 312/238-4572.
Project Number: H133B090024.
Start Date: October 1, 2009.
Length: 60 months.
NIDRR Officer: Dawn Carlson, PhD, MPH.
NIDRR Funding: FY 09 $850,000; FY 10 $850,000; FY 11 $850,000; FY 12 $850,000; FY 13 $850,000; FY 14 $ 0.
Abstract: This project focuses on combining innovative measurement, data collection, and reporting methods with practical concerns for usability, implementation, and multi-user communication. Measurement of the cognitive and environmental factors affecting participation is hampered by instruments that are not tailored appropriately to persons with disabilities or for use in time-pressed clinical settings. This project focuses on persons with traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, and stroke because these groups experience complex cognitive, physical, sensory, and emotional impairments that limit access to and use of standardized test protocols. Specific project goals include: (1) increasing the accessibility of measures of cognitive function for use in rehabilitation settings so that consumers’ needs and outcomes are documented; (2) examining the reliability, validity, and sensitivity of measures of cognitive function for persons with disabilities within major item banks including the NIH Toolbox, the Executive Function Performance Test, NeuroQOL, TBI-QOL, SCI-QOL, and SCI-CAT projects; (3) evaluating and refining measures of barriers and facilitators of community participation enabling better evaluation of the outcomes of rehabilitation services; (4) utilizing the large set of data to examine the validity of the cognitive items on the Continuity and Record Evaluation Tool, a standardized patient assessment instrument developed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services; and (5) evaluating the extent to which the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) represents disablement characteristics by mapping instruments collected as part of project activities to concepts within the ICF. This RRTC conducts research; hosts forums for discussion; publishes in the rehabilitation science, health policy, and consumer literature; trains new researchers in rehabilitation-focused health services research; and disseminates information to diverse scientific, clinician, consumer, and policymaker audiences.
Descriptors: Consumers, Health care, Outcomes, Policy, Rehabilitation medicine, Rehabilitation services.